Quote: Team Goals

My mission is to create teams that change the world.

I began this mission as a software developer. I saw in myself and other teams a passion for creating products that people would use and love. I saw that same passion dashed over and over again when the products fell flat. I knew there was more out there.

I have sought for years to find ways of enabling teams and organizations to have a different story. One where the hard work pays off. One where people take pride in a job well done and a product that people love.

I’m a long way off still from saying my mission is accomplished, but I’m here to share what I’ve learned and to help people find that new story.

~ Ryan Latta, LeanAgileUS 2019 bio https://twitter.com/recursivefaults

The Programmers Oath by Uncle Bob

The Programmers Oath by Uncle Bob

In order to defend and preserve the honor of the profession of computer programmers,

I Promise that, to the best of my ability and judgement:

  1. I will not produce harmful code.
  2. The code that I produce will always be my best work. I will not knowingly allow code that is defective either in behavior or structure to accumulate.
  3. I will produce, with each release, a quick, sure, and repeatable proof that every element of the code works as it should.
  4. I will make frequent, small, releases so that I do not impede the progress of others.
  5. I will fearlessly and relentlessly improve my creations at every opportunity. I will never degrade them.
  6. I will do all that I can to keep the productivity of myself, and others, as high as possible. I will do nothing that decreases that productivity.
  7. I will continuously ensure that others can cover for me, and that I can cover for them.
  8. I will produce estimates that are honest both in magnitude and precision. I will not make promises without certainty.
  9. I will never stop learning and improving my craft.

Quote: The End of the Beginning

Quote This quote is from a book I read to my children the other night but feel it is just as relevant to this side of my world as that one.  Learning to be able to identify when to rush and get something out the door and when to slow down and take some extra time is difficult but necessary in the work we do.

~ Avi, The End of the Beginning: Being the Adventures of a Small Snail (and an Even Smaller Ant)

Links: April 17

Code, code and more code.: Technical Debt, a case study : tags: At Stack Exchange, we have a fair understanding of technical debt. Like real debt, technical debt is not by necessity a bad thing – it can allow you to choose an acceptable (but not ideal) solution today, which means you can ship today, but you know that at some point you are going to have to revisit it. Like all loans, technical debt carries interest.

— Marc Gravell

 

Write Code Every Day: Last fall, work on my coding side projects came to a head: I wasn’t making adequate progress and I couldn’t find a way to get more done without sacrificing my ability to do effective work at Khan Academy.

There were a few major problems with how I was working on my side projects. I was primarily working on them during the weekends and sometimes in the evenings during the week. This is a strategy that does not work well for me, as it turns out.

— John Resig

 

Exploring ASP.NET Web Pages – A fully-featured MiniBlog using just Razor: ASP.NET “Razor” Web Pages are ASP.NET sites without models, views, controllers, or project files. Some folks say “oh, that’s just Classic ASP, or PHP right? Not at all. It’s the full power and speed of the .NET CLR, the full syntax of C#, LINQ, along with things like C# dynamics. It’s super powerful, and my friend Mads and I are surprised more people don’t use them for small things.

— Scott Hanselman